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Ok, now that I have that basic LISP post out, you know this one LISP – Say What?!, I figured I would build upon that configuration. Today I will show you how to overlay IPv6 at your sites while keeping your core IPv4 only.  There is no IPv6 addressing nor routing configured on the core Routers and this post will continue where the other one left off, no configuration changes have been made prior to this post, except I did have to upgrade from a base image to an Enterprise image to support IPv6 on R2, R3, and R4.  R1 is still running an IOS that does not support LISP nor IPv6.  This post will focus on the configuration first and then the explanation of how last.

Below is the same topology I used in the other LISP post, just added some IPv6 addressing and routing protocols for Site-A and Site-B. I am going to build on what we have done in the other lab, so not all the necessary LISP configs are here for a scratch-built config.  I have included the full configs in the bottom of this post if you would like to look at them.

Quick rundown on color codes again:
Router Output
Notes
Commands

Lets start with R4, the LISP MS/MR device.  We will configure this to accept the IPv6 networks to the xTR routers at Site A and Site B

We need to enable IPv6 Routing on R4.  There will no no IPv6 interfaces, but it still needs to understand how to route IPv6 for when a request comes in
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
Now we need to enable the IPv6 address family under the VRF, just like we did for IPv4.
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config)# vrf definition lisp
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config-vrf)# rd 1:1
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config-vrf)# address-family ipv6
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
Now enable LISP to be a map-server and resolver for IPv6
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config)# ipv6 lisp map-server
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config)# ipv6 lisp map-resolver
And just like IPv4, we need to add the IPv6 networks for the mappings for Site A and Site B
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config)# lisp site Site-A
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 2001:DB8:0:1::/64 accept-more-specifics
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 2001:DB8:0:2::/64 accept-more-specifics
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 2001:DB8:0:3::/64 accept-more-specifics
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 2001:DB8:0:25::/64 accept-more-specifics
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config)# lisp site Site-B
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::/64 accept-more-specifics
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 2001:DB8:0:1002::/64 accept-more-specifics
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 2001:DB8:0:1003::/64 accept-more-specifics
LISP_R4_MP_MR(config-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 2001:DB8:0:1036::/64 accept-more-specifics

That is all that is necessary on R4 in order for LISP.  Just to prove there is no IPv6 configured:
LISP_R4_MP_MR# sh ipv int br
GigabitEthernet0/0         [up/up]
unassigned

Now, lets to the other two routers that are not part of LISP, namely R5 and R6.

R5 first

First we will enable IPv6 routing
LISP_R5(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
Configure and enable IPv6 OSPF process 1
LISP_R5(config)# ipv6 router ospf 1
LISP_R5(config-rtr)# log-adjacency-changes
Now we can assign our IPv6 addresses to our existing Loopback addresses and place these interfaces into OSPF PID 1 Area 0
LISP_R5(config)# interface Loopback1
LISP_R5(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:0:1::5/64
LISP_R5(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
LISP_R5(config)# interface Loopback2
LISP_R5(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:0:2::5/64
LISP_R5(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
LISP_R5(config)#  interface Loopback3
LISP_R5(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:0:3::5/64
LISP_R5(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
LISP_R5(config)# interface FastEthernet0/1
LISP_R5(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:0:25::5/64
LISP_R5(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0

That is all that is needed for R5.  The reason we created an OSPF process is so that we can learn an IPv6 default ( ::/0 ) route from R2

now R6

Just like R5, we will enable IPv6 routing.
LISP_R6(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
Then create the IPv6 OSPF Process 1
LISP_R6(config)# ipv6 router ospf 1
LISP_R6(config-rtr)# log-adjacency-changes
Now we will assign the IPv6 addresses to the interfaces as well as place the interfaces in IPv6 OSPF Process ID 1, Area 0
LISP_R6(config)# interface Loopback1
LISP_R6(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:0:1001::6/64
LISP_R6(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
LISP_R6(config)# interface Loopback2
LISP_R6(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:0:1002::6/64
LISP_R6(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
LISP_R6(config)# interface Loopback3
LISP_R6(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:0:1003::6/64
LISP_R6(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
LISP_R6(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/1
LISP_R6(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:0:1036::6/64
LISP_R6(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0

Again, that is all for R6.  And just like R5, we created OSPF so that we can learn an IPv6 default ( ::/0 ) route from R3

So, now we can configure our xTR routers – R2 and R3.  R2 first

R2
Again, we need to enable IPv6 on these devices
LISP_R2(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
Now we create the IPv6 OSPF process and configure it to generate the default route ( ::/0 ) to R5
LISP_R2(config)# ipv6 router ospf 1
LISP_R2(config-rtr)# default-information originate always
There are no configuration changes on G0/0, it maintains its IPv4 address – there is NO IPv6 configured on this interface.
LISP_R2(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/0
Now we can configure the EID side of the network with IPv6 and place the interface into IPv6 OSPF PID 1, Area 0
LISP_R2(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/1
LISP_R2(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:0:25::2/64
LISP_R2(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
Now we can configure this device to be an xTR and the associated LISP map-resolver and LISP map-server
LISP_R2(config)# ipv6 lisp itr
LISP_R2(config)# ipv6 lisp itr map-resolver 10.1.14.4
LISP_R2(config)# ipv6 lisp etr
LISP_R2(config)# ipv6 lisp etr map-server 10.1.14.4 key Fryguy
Now we have to tell the MR/MS what EIDs are reachable via our RLOC interface
LISP_R2(config)# ipv6 lisp database-mapping 2001:DB8:0:1::/64 IPv4-interface GigabitEthernet0/0 priority 1 weight 100
LISP_R2(config)# ipv6 lisp database-mapping 2001:DB8:0:2::/64 IPv4-interface GigabitEthernet0/0 priority 1 weight 100
LISP_R2(config)# ipv6 lisp database-mapping 2001:DB8:0:3::/64 IPv4-interface GigabitEthernet0/0 priority 1 weight 100
LISP_R2(config)# ipv6 lisp database-mapping 2001:DB8:0:25::/64 IPv4-interface GigabitEthernet0/0 priority 1 weight 100

Now onto R3
R3
Like all the other routes, we will enable IPv6
LISP_R3(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
…and configure OSPF PID 1. Again, configuring the router to generate the ::/0 route for R6
LISP_R3(config)# ipv6 router ospf 1
LISP_R3(config-rtr)# default-information originate always
Now we an configure the IPv6 side of the router, and as with all the other routers, place the interface into OSPF
LISP_R3(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/0
LISP_R3(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:0:1036::3/64
LISP_R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
Again, we do not make any changes to the LISP RLOC interface, no IPv6 on this interface!
LISP_R3(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/1
Now we can configure the router to be an xTR with the MS/MR of 10.1.14.4
LISP_R3(config)# ipv6 lisp itr
LISP_R3(config)# ipv6 lisp itr map-resolver 10.1.14.4
LISP_R3(config)# ipv6 lisp etr
LISP_R3(config)# ipv6 lisp etr map-server 10.1.14.4 key Fryguy
And now all the database mappings for the EIDs that are reachable via the RLOC interface
LISP_R3(config)# ipv6 lisp database-mapping 2001:DB8:0:1000::/54 IPv4-interface GigabitEthernet0/1 priority 1 weight 100
LISP_R3(config)# ipv6 lisp database-mapping 2001:DB8:0:1001::/64 IPv4-interface GigabitEthernet0/1 priority 1 weight 100
LISP_R3(config)# ipv6 lisp database-mapping 2001:DB8:0:1002::/64 IPv4-interface GigabitEthernet0/1 priority 1 weight 100
LISP_R3(config)# ipv6 lisp database-mapping 2001:DB8:0:1003::/64 IPv4-interface GigabitEthernet0/1 priority 1 weight 100
LISP_R3(config)# ipv6 lisp database-mapping 2001:DB8:0:1036::/64 IPv4-interface GigabitEthernet0/1 priority 1 weight 100

So, now that everything is configured, lets do a PING from R5 Loopback1 to R6 Loopback1
LISP_R5# ping ipv6 2001:DB8:0:1001::6 source loopback 1

Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 2001:DB8:0:1001::6, timeout is 2 seconds:
.!!!!
Success rate is 80 percent (4/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/2/4 ms
LISP_R5#

There we go, it worked!  LISP allowed us to encapsulate the IPv6 packet within IPv4 without have to configure 6to4 tunnels and such.
Why?  Well, LISP encapsulate the original packet when it goes from one RLOC to the other RLOC 🙂

Now that we have that all configured and tested, lets look at the output from R4 using a the command sh lisp site summary. As you will see, we now have 4 configured networks for IPv6 and 4 registered.  Our IPv4 routes and networks are still there from before, none of that changed.
LISP_R4_MP_MR# sh lisp site summary

…………………….———– IPv4 ———–……….———– IPv6 ———–
Site name……….Configured Registered Incons Configured Registered Incons
Site-A…………………………2……………2……….0……………4…………….4……….0
Site-B…………………………2…………….2……….0…………..4…………….4……….0

Number of configured sites:……………………..2
Number of registered sites:………………………2
Sites with inconsistent registrations:………….0
IPv4
..Number of configured EID prefixes:…………..4
..Number of registered EID prefixes:……………4
IPv6
..Number of configured EID prefixes:…………..8
..Number of registered EID prefixes:……………8
LISP_R4_MP_MR#

Now we can look at the output from show lisp site to see what networks are registered.  As you can see, both IPv4 and Ipv6 networks are listed with their perspective RLOC routers.

LISP_R4_MP_MR# sh lisp site
LISP Site Registration Information

Site Name      Last      Up   Who Last             Inst     EID Prefix
Register       Registered           ID
Site-A         00:00:02  yes  10.1.12.2                     150.1.25.0/24
…………….00:00:02  yes  10.1.12.2                     150.1.125.0/24
……………. 00:00:07  yes  10.1.12.2                     2001:DB8:0:1::/64
……………. 00:00:07  yes  10.1.12.2                     2001:DB8:0:2::/64
……………. 00:00:07  yes  10.1.12.2                     2001:DB8:0:3::/64
……………. 00:00:07  yes  10.1.12.2                     2001:DB8:0:25::/64
Site-B         00:00:53  yes  10.1.13.3                     150.1.36.0/24
……………. 00:00:53  yes  10.1.13.3                     150.1.136.0/24
……………. 00:00:10  yes  10.1.13.3                     2001:DB8:0:1001::/64
……………. 00:00:10  yes  10.1.13.3                     2001:DB8:0:1002::/64
……………. 00:00:10  yes  10.1.13.3                     2001:DB8:0:1003::/64
……………. 00:00:10  yes  10.1.13.3                     2001:DB8:0:1036::/64
LISP_R4_MP_MR#

Now, just like I did for the IPv4 only lab, here is the debug output from debug lisp control-plane all. If you need an explanation, just refer to the prior post please.

LISP_R2# debug lisp control-plane all
LISP_R2#
*Apr  8 22:18:21.098: LISP: Processing data signal for EID prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::6/128
*Apr  8 22:18:21.098: LISP: Remote EID prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::6/128, Change state to incomplete (method: data-signal, state: unknown, rlocs: 0).
*Apr  8 22:18:21.098: LISP: Remote EID prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::6/128, Scheduling map requests (incomplete) (method: data-signal, state: incomplete, rlocs: 0).
*Apr  8 22:18:21.130: LISP: Send map request for EID prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::6/128
*Apr  8 22:18:21.130: LISP: Remote EID prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::6/128, Send map request (1) (method: data-signal, state: incomplete, rlocs: 0).
*Apr  8 22:18:21.130: LISP: AF IPv6, Sending map-request from 2001:DB8:0:25::2 to 2001:DB8:0:1001::6 for EID 2001:DB8:0:1001::6/128, ITR-RLOCs 1, nonce 0xC4B2E8BE-0x4DCA442F (encap src 10.1.12.2, dst 10.1.14.4).
*Apr  8 22:18:21.130: LISP: Processing received Map-Reply message from 10.1.13.3 to 10.1.12.2
*Apr  8 22:18:21.130: LISP: Received map reply nonce 0xC4B2E8BE-
LISP_R2#0x4DCA442F, records 1
*Apr  8 22:18:21.130: LISP: Map Request prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::6/128 remote EID prefix, Received reply with rtt 0ms.
*Apr  8 22:18:21.130: LISP: Processing mapping information for EID prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::/64
*Apr  8 22:18:21.130: LISP: Remote EID prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::/64, Change state to complete (method: map-reply, state: unknown, rlocs: 0).
*Apr  8 22:18:21.130: LISP: Remote EID prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::/64, Starting idle timer (method: map-reply, state: complete, rlocs: 0).
*Apr  8 22:18:21.130: LISP: Remote EID prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::6/128, Change state to deleted (method: data-signal, state: incomplete, rlocs: 0).
*Apr  8 22:18:21.134: LISP: Remote EID prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::/64, Recalculated RLOC status bits from 0x0 to 0x1 (method: map-reply, state: complete, rlocs: 1).
*Apr  8 22:18:21.134: LISP RIB_RWATCH: (default:ipv4:base) T 10.1.13.3/32 EVENT Track start
*Apr  8 22:18:21.134: LISP RIB_RWATCH: (default:ipv4:base) N 10.1.13.3/32 Adding track
*Apr  8 22:18:21.134: LISP RIB_RWATCH: (default:ipv4:base) N 10.1.13.3/32 QP Schedule query
*Apr  8 22:18:21.134: LISP RIB_RWATCH: (default:ipv4:base) T 10.1.13.3/32 EVENT Query found route
*Apr  8 22:18:21.134: LISP RIB_RWATCH: (default:ipv4:base) R 10.0.0.0/8  d=1 p=1 -> 10.1.12.1 (base) 0 Updating
*Apr  8 22:18:21.134: LISP RIB_RWATCH: Adding to client notification queue
*Apr  8 22:18:21.134: LISP: Remote EID prefix 2001:DB8:0:1001::/64 locator 10.1.13.3 priority 1 weight 100, Added locator (method: map-reply, state: complete, rlocs: 1).
*Apr  8 22:18:21.134: LISP RIB_RWATCH: (default:ipv4:base) W 10.1.13.3/32 c=0x69B38AB8 Client notified reachable
LISP_R2#
LISP_R2#

Now from R5 I will ping the rest of the IPv6 interfaces on R6:

LISP_R5# ping ipv6 2001:DB8:0:1002::6 source loopback 1

Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 2001:DB8:0:1002::6, timeout is 2 seconds:
.!!!!
Success rate is 80 percent (4/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/2/4 ms
LISP_R5# ping ipv6 2001:DB8:0:1003::6 source loopback 1

Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 2001:DB8:0:1003::6, timeout is 2 seconds:
.!!!!
Success rate is 80 percent (4/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/2/4 ms
LISP_R5#

This way we can now look at the R2 LISP Map Cache

LISP_R2# sh ipv6 lisp map-cache
LISP IPv6 Mapping Cache, 4 entries

::/0, uptime: 00:11:01, expires: never, via static
Negative cache entry, action: send-map-request
2001:DB8:0:1001::/64, uptime: 00:10:50, expires: 23:49:02, via map-reply, complete
Locator    Uptime    State      Pri/Wgt
10.1.13.3 00:10:50  up           1/100
2001:DB8:0:1002::/64, uptime: 00:00:07, expires: 23:59:45, via map-reply, complete
Locator    Uptime    State      Pri/Wgt
10.1.13.3 00:00:07  up           1/100
2001:DB8:0:1003::/64, uptime: 00:00:02, expires: 23:59:50, via map-reply, complete
Locator    Uptime    State      Pri/Wgt
10.1.13.3 00:00:02  up           1/100
LISP_R2#

As you can see, all the IPv6 routes are reachable via 10.1.13.3 – an IPv4 address 🙂

Here are the configs for the routers

R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6

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